U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken

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50 years since the adoption of UN General Assembly Resolution 2758, US Secretary of State Blinken issued a statement on the 26th supporting Taiwan’s participation in the United Nations. (Courtesy of the U.S. Department of State)

Antony John Blinken (English: Antony John Blinken, born April 16, 1962), an American foreign affairs expert and government official, is currently the 71st Secretary of State of the United States. He served as deputy national security adviser and deputy secretary of state during the Barack Obama administration.

During his time in the Clinton administration, Blinken held senior positions at the State Department and the National Security Council. During the Bush administration, he was a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and staff director of the U.S. Senate Foreign Affairs Committee. During the Obama era, Blinken was a member of the presidential transition team. Blinken then served as deputy assistant to the president and national security adviser to the vice president from 2009 to 2013. After 2017, Blinken pursued private business work and co-founded a political strategy consulting firm.

50 years since the adoption of UN General Assembly Resolution 2758, US Secretary of State Blinken issued a statement today supporting Taiwan’s participation in the United Nations. Blinken said that excluding Taiwan would undermine the work of the United Nations and related organizations, and the United States encourages all United Nations member states to support Taiwan's meaningful participation.

President Tsai Ing-wen responded to Blinken's tweet, thanking Blinken for supporting Taiwan's participation in the United Nations system, and saying "we will continue to work with the United States and other like-minded partners to overcome the challenges facing the international community."

It will be 50 years since the United Nations General Assembly passed Resolution 2758 on the 25th. On the eve of the anniversary, Rick Waters, the US Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Asia and the Pacific, rarely publicly criticized China for "misusing" Resolution 2758 to exclude Taiwan. Many US Congressmen Heavyweight lawmakers also issued statements accusing Beijing of misinterpreting Resolution 2758 for many years.

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The day after the 50th anniversary of the resolution, Antony Blinken issued a statement supporting Taiwan's participation in the United Nations system. He said that Taiwan has become a democratic success story. The Taiwan model supports information transparency, respect for human rights and the rule of law, which are consistent with the values ​​of the United Nations. Taiwan also plays a key role in the global high-tech economy and is a hub for tourism, culture and education.

 

Blinken pointed out that the United States is one of the many United Nations member states that regard Taiwan as a valuable partner and reliable friend. At a time when the international community is facing an unprecedented number of complex global issues, it is critical that all stakeholders can help solve the problems, "including the 24 million people living in Taiwan."

 

Blinken emphasized: "Taiwan's meaningful participation in the United Nations system is not a political issue, but a pragmatic issue."

 

Blinken said that Taiwan's strong participation in specific United Nations specialized agencies for most of the past 50 years proves that the international community believes that Taiwan's contributions are valuable, but Taiwan has recently not been allowed to contribute to the work of the United Nations.

 

Blinken gave an example. Tens of millions of passengers pass through Taiwan's airports every year, but Taiwan has no representatives at the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) assembly. Although the outside world has much to learn from Taiwan's "world-class" epidemic prevention, Taiwan has not participated in the World Health Organization. Assembly (WHA).

Not only that, Blinken pointed out that members of global civil society interact and communicate at the United Nations every day, but Taiwanese scientists, technical experts, business people, artists, educators, students, human rights workers, etc. are prohibited from visiting simply because of the passports they hold. Enter and may not participate in these activities.

Blinken said that excluding Taiwan would undermine the important work of the United Nations and its related agencies, and that these agencies would benefit greatly from Taiwan's contribution. The world needs to leverage the contributions of all stakeholders to solve mutual challenges.

Blinken emphasized: "This is why we encourage all United Nations members to join the United States in supporting Taiwan's strong and meaningful participation in the United Nations system and international organizations." He pointed out that this is in line with the United States' "One China Policy," which is based on Taiwan's The Relations Act, the Three U.S.-China Communiqués and the Six Assurances on Taiwan serve as guidelines. ((Central News Agency reporter Xu Weiting special telegraph from Washington on the 26th) Editor: Huang Ziqiang) 1101027